Recent findings suggest a rather worrying trend among workforces failing to fully appreciate or prioritise their data security.

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Findings of underprepared organisations

The Ponemon Institute conducted a 2017 study into data protection and discovered that 63 per cent of organisations felt their knowledge of IoT and mobile applications was lacking. Despite 84 per cent of respondents being aware of the serious risk of data breaches, over two thirds hadn’t designated adequate financial resources for this purpose. The findings suggest that while organisations may be aware of the risk posed, proactive action is not always forthcoming to the extent necessary.

It is more important than ever to recognise the need for successful endpoint security implementation, especially as technology is constantly evolving the shape and nature of the workforce at increasing speeds, with more organisations taking on IoT and mobile applications.

This is illustrated by HIS Markit’s report that estimates the number of IoT devices in 2017 throughout the world will hit 20 billion. Meanwhile, Strategy Analytics suggests the number of mobile workers will make up 42.5 per cent of the worldwide workforce by 2022.

Working toward a solution

One problem occurs when the workforce, requiring flexible working and constant connectivity, feels hindered by any interference to the access of their devices and network. This can then lead to shadow IT, where an employee bypasses security procedures and authorised networks to ensure the freedom they need.

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To prevent this, endpoint security management from the likes of promisec.com is imperative.

To combat the issues faced by organisations when it comes to endpoint security, five developments may hold some solutions. First, thin clients are now more mobile and effective than ever in providing a seamless experience. Second, with device and network awareness, systems are better able to block unauthorised access. Then, with Mobile Device Management, organisations can to monitor the use of devices and directly affect them, such as by restricting access to certain features. Fourth, thin clients prevent data breaches by not locally storing data, and finally, users can be provided with a USB to boot the thin client on their device while remotely working.

The thin client model may prove more effective in improving endpoint software, and it’s imperative that organisations prioritise and invest in their security as the mobile workforce continues to grow.

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